New Mind Report on Talking Therapies

Mind has today released a report called “We Need to Talk. Getting the Right Therapy at the Right Time.” on behalf of the We Need to Talk Coalition.

The Coalition includes rethink, Young Minds, Royal College of Psychiatrists, St Mungo’s, Mind, and the British Psychological Society.

They are calling for all people who need it to  be offered a full range of psychological therapies by the NHS, within 28 days of requesting a referral.

The Report highlights in particular:


  • the lack of equality of access to pyschological therapy for different groups in society, including men, ethnic minorities, older people, and children.

  • the lack of appropriate therapy for those with severe mental health problems, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and people who self-harm.
  • the disparity in services across the country, with people being unable to access certain therapies in one county while is it available in a neighbouring county.
  • the variation in waiting times for therapy across the country.
  • the low number of sessions of therapy people are receiving in comparison to NICE guidelines.
  • the lack of availability of choice of therapies and information about different types of therapy.
  • the human and economic cost of not providing suitable therapy at the appropriate time to those who want it.

The report highlights a number of people’s personal experiences, and makes a range of recommendations to the Government, Service Commissioners, Primary Care Practitioners, the Care Quality Commission, and NICE. I recommend having a read of it if you can.

 

Some key points within the report:

“Choice

• Only eight per cent had a full choice about which
therapy they received.

• 40 per cent had the different psychological therapies
explained to them.

• Just 13 per cent had a choice of where they
received therapy.

• Half had a choice about the time of their appointments.

• 28 per cent had to pay privately because the therapy
they wanted was not available.

Waiting times

• One in five people have been waiting over a year
to receive treatment.

• One in 10 people have been waiting over two years
to receive treatment.

• Around a third of people are waiting under
six months to receive treatment.

Treatment

• Half got the treatment they felt they needed.

• 40 per cent felt that therapy did or might have
helped them get back to work quicker.

• Of those for whom treatment was not successful,
43 per cent were not offered any other treatment.

• Only 40 per cent felt they had enough
therapy sessions.

Satisfaction with therapy

• Those waiting three months or less from assessment
to therapy were over twice as likely to be happy with
their treatment as those waiting 10 to 11 months.

• People who had had their choices explained to them
were twice as likely to be happy with their treatment
than those who hadn’t (67 per cent compared to
34 per cent).

• Having a full choice of therapy was associated with
people being three times more likely to be happy
with their treatment than those who wanted a
choice but did not get it (91 per cent compared
to 28 per cent).

• Being able to choose a location of treatment that
was right for them was associated with people being
much more likely to be happy with their treatment
than those who could not (73 per cent compared
to 41 per cent).

• Being able to choose a time of appointment that
was right for them was associated with people
being almost twice as likely to be happy with their
treatment as those who could not (64 per cent
compared to 36 per cent).

Getting back to work

• Those waiting less than three months from
assessment to treatment were almost five times more
likely to report that therapy definitely helped them
get back to work than those waiting one to two
years (19 per cent compared to four per cent).

• Having a full choice of therapy was associated
with people being five times as likely to report
that therapy definitely helped them back to work
than those who did not (38 per cent compared to
eight per cent).

• Being able to choose a location of treatment that
was right for them was associated with people being
almost twice as likely to report that therapy definitely
helped them back to work as those who could not
(24 per cent compared to 14 per cent).

• Being able to choose a time of appointment that was
right for them was associated with people being over
twice as likely to report that therapy definitely helped
them back to work as those who could not (20 per
cent compared to eight per cent).

• Having enough therapy sessions was associated
with people being over three times as likely to report
that therapy definitely helped them back to work
as those who did not (26 per cent compared to
eight per cent).”

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